Research

From Big Brothers Big Sisters of America: 

Little steps lead to BIG impact! Research proves that children enrolled in Big Brothers Big Sisters programs are more likely to improve in school, in their relationships with with family and friends and are less likely to skip school or use illegal drugs or alcohol.

 

The 2013 Big Brothers Big Sisters Youth Outcomes Survey (YOS) report reflects across-the-board gains for youth a year after being in a one-to-one mentoring relationship, as well as compared to their peers who do not have mentors — with middle-school aged mentees outperforming their unmatched counterparts in every area measured.

 

For youth enrolled in Big Brothers Big Sisters’ community-based, one-to-one mentoring program:

  • 94 percent maintained or improved in their attitudes towards risky behaviors
  • 88 percent maintained or improved in parental trust
  • 85 percent maintained or improved in their educational expectation
  • 83 percent maintained or improved in scholastic competence and
  • 83 percent maintained or improved in social acceptance.

For Big Brothers Big Sisters’ school-based mentees:

  • 90 percent maintained or improved in social acceptance
  • 90 percent maintained or improved in their attitudes towards risky behaviors
  • 87 percent maintained or improved in their educational expectations
  • 86 percent maintained or improved in parental trust and
  • 84 percent maintained or improved in their grades.

 

 

 

From MENTOR: The National Mentoring Partnership

The Mentoring Effect a 2014 report produced by MENTOR, HART Research Associates and Civic Enterprises—confirms that mentoring has a significant impact that results in positive outcomes for the youth involved. These critical one-to-one relationships connect youth to social and economic opportunity, and through their success the mentoring effect has the potential to strengthen families, schools, businesses and communities.

Research in Action is an innovative series that highlights the importance of connecting mentoring research to practice and policy to increase the impact of youth mentoring. The series contains 10 issues on some of the most pressing topics facing the youth mentoring field. The foundation of each issue is Research – an article written by a leading scholar who summarizes the latest research and offers insight into the implications of that research on mentoring practice. Those implications are then expanded into tools, activities, resources, or training exercises in the Action section, providing practitioners with a concrete application of the research findings in their everyday operations